Kilim Carpets from The Real Rug Company - CLick here for the homepage
phone the real rug company for flokati rugs information
floakti delivery - free in the UK
Bitcoins accepted here - click to find out more

KILIMS

All Kilims can be ordered on approval for 7 days. That means that if you can put it in place for up to 7 days and if you don't want it, then you can return it at our expense.

Click Here to arrange a viewing
You are welcome to visit us.

Each Kilim is unique. There is only one available in each style. We have personally selected the kilims in the range - which is why they are all so outstandingly beautiful. Some are flat weave kilims and some are kilim carpets.

All of our kilims are 100% hand made (through the whole process , please read below to find out more). They are all made from pure wool. No-one else has this quality in stock in the UK.

This kilims should and will last a lifetime. They will become softer, shinier and more beautiful with time and use. Look out for the older kilims below.

COLOURS: Natural colours are the best meditation. After all day working you are so tired  you can come to your home and relax. The red give you energy yellow and orange is appetite. Purple is inspire and make you think over the line. Blue is hapines.

Please click here to read more...
.... its worth reading....

(view/hide)

To make a real kilim carpet (which is %100 hand made, like all of ours) ...                  
1) She cut the wool from the sheep. She has to clean the wool.       
2) She has to spin the wool by hand,to make a thread.
3) She has to dye the material with natural colours (vegetable dyes).                                     
4) She has to dry  them under the sun.              
5) She has to hang up the wool on the loom.                                 
6) She has to think (dream of the design)and (to be inspired) and then she can start to make a kilim carpet with a patience.   

So if they do all this together this means the kilim carpet is %100 hand made. 

But this is not always like that.  All hand knotted kilim carpets are not %100 hand made !  Because they are using  machine spun material (they don't spend time for a hand spin) and they don't do natural colours (it is not easy to find natural dyes,and it is becoming missing culture) and the design are ready (by computer) she has to count of number of the knots, like 2 time's red 5 time's blue. She work like a robot. She is only doing hand knot.not the another work.    

In Turkey in other country also mostly kilim carpets are made in this way.

How to make a kilim carpet  
The weaving is started from the bottom of the loom.  First the kilim part (flat woven part) is woven at the lower edge. The weaver then takes a piece of wool which corresponds with the pattern and forms a knot on two warps. Then she cuts the surplus wool with a knife.      After one row of knotting is completed, she then passes a weft thread in between the front and back warps. The weft threads are used to strengthen the weaves of the kilim carpet.  

Then she will take the ''kirkit'' (a heavy comb like a tool) and vigorously beat down the row of the kilim carpet of knots and weft in order to obtain the desired tightness and to make the knots and weft compact. Following this step, with a pair of adjustable scissors she cuts the surplus colored threads to obtain a uniform level of pile thickness. The process in continued until the kilim carpet is complete.

The turkish kilim carpet's are double knot. Turkish knot is wrapped around two warps, persian knot around a single warp. So it makes the kilim carpet stronger, firmer and more durable.  In this form of knotting, each end of the pile thread is wrapped all the way around the two warps, pulled down and cut. More info is on the way.

The best material to make a carpet is the wool. because wool is durable.only wool is absorbing the natural colour.(wool has the lanolin inside natural oil of the wool but it must be hand spun. If it is machine spun, wool is losing the oil ! The wool gets better and better as time passes, they get softer and start to have a shine This is useful, and by the time after use they get much more valuable. Ok.

Why silk carpets are expensive? Because they use expensive material to make. But after using wool carpets they get much more expensive then silk carpet. The technique and motif has has been passed from generation to generation, from mother to daughter , Turkey is only country in the world that has preserved all different techniques. Carpet, kilim ,cicim, sumak, zili.

All design has meaning like ; tree of life symbolizing long life and re-birth and generation. The horns of animals symbolize;power,pride. Hand on hips symbolize; female fertility and the mother of god. Hanging candle symbolize; the holy (eternal) light. Running water symbolizes; fertile, richness. Medallion symbolize; their tribe. Peacock symbolize; paradise. Star symbolize; eternity.

Also there are some motifs like a leaf, vase, footprint of animals, rose, tulip, flower motifs are on the carpets. All these designs have been used since 2000 years ago (at this time Turkish peple were not muslim).

All kilim carpets they look different colour from two different end. so one side is dark colour if you look from other side the colour is light. because when they make it,pile on the carpet dosent stand perpendicular, pile is leaning to one side. Meaning of this from one side light is going in side to the pile and it is look like dark colour. from other side light has reflection. More information at the bottom of this page:

Kilim 4 - Click to Enlarge
click to enlarge

Kilim 4 (K4)

This flat woven kilim comes from Konya. The background is blue, with subtle variations in colour which will remind you of water. The of colour are sunset red and rich aubergine. The design is called simplicity. It is a project kilim, like kilim number 2.   It is made in the old way to rediscover the trations. It will become more vaulable as it ages.  

Size: 185x145cm

only £

Free next day delivery on this item

Kilim 4 - from another angle - click to enlarge

Here is a photo from directly above. It is always good to have different views of the kilims so you can get a better idea how the colours look - sometimes they look surprisingly different from different angles.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Kilim 5 - Click to Enlarge
click to enlarge

Kilim 5 (K5)

This flat weave kilim is from Konya. It has a waterfall design. The colours are mainly greenish-blue colour. It is a project kilim like kilim's 2 and 4.  It is made in the old way to rediscover the trations. It will become more vaulable as it ages.

Size: 190x147cm 

only £

Free next day delivery on this item

Kilim 5 - from another angle - click to enlarge

Here is a photo from directly above. It is always good to have different views of the kilims so you can get a better idea how the colours look - sometimes they look surprisingly different from different angles.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Kilim 10 - Click to Enlarge
click to enlarge

Kilim 10 (K10)

This large flatweave kilim comes from Sivas. It is 60 years old. The colours include pistachio nut green, soft pink, apricot, dark blue, some white and saffron.

Size: 290x140cm                             

only £

Free next day delivery on this item

Kilim 10 - from another angle - click to enlarge

Here is a photo from directly above. It is always good to have different views of the kilims so you can get a better idea how the colours look - sometimes they look surprisingly different from different angles.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Kilim 9 - Click to Enlarge
click to enlarge

Kilim 11 (K11)

This Kilim Carpet is 60 years old. It's name is Mikra and it comes from the Caucasus. The base colour is apricot colour and in center is purple. It has 5 borders. Like all our kilims it is natural dyes and handspun wool.

Size: 190x134cm

only £

Free next day delivery on this item

Kilim 12 - Click to Enlarge
click to enlarge

Kilim 12 (K12)

This kilim carpet is called Sirvan. It is 40 years old. The center is red and blue, The wool is all natural colours and all handspun material. Blues of this deepness are quite unusual. Click to enlarge the picture , the bigger picture looks quite different due to the how the light is catching it. One of the signs of a high quality carpet is the range of colours which become apparent from different angles and in different lighting conditions.

Size: 202x137cm

only £

Free next day delivery on this item

Kilim 12 - from another angle - click to enlarge

Here is a photo from directly above. It is always good to have different views of the kilims so you can get a better idea how the colours look - sometimes they look surprisingly different from different angles.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Kilim 14 - Click to Enlarge
click to enlarge

Kilim 14 (K14)

This kilim carpet is from Sirvan. It is 40 years old. It has a medallion design. It feels very soft. The colours are mainly red , white and green. It has 3 borders.

Size: 210x131cm

only £

Free next day delivery on this item

Kilim 14 - from another angle - click to enlarge

Here is a photo from directly above. It is always good to have different views of the kilims so you can get a better idea how the colours look - sometimes they look surprisingly different from different angles.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Kilim 16 - Click to Enlarge
click to enlarge

Kilim 16 (K16)

This kilim carpet is a nomad carpet (yörük). It is 40years old. The border is a running water design. It has a big center design showing a tree of life and animal dance design. The base colour is red.

Size: 193x124cm

only £

Free next day delivery on this item

Kilim 16 - from another angle - click to enlarge

Here is a photo from directly above. It is always good to have different views of the kilims so you can get a better idea how the colours look - sometimes they look surprisingly different from different angles.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Kilim 19 - Click to Enlarge
click to enlarge

Kilim 19 (K19)                       

This kilim carpet is 70 years old. It comes from Avanos.

In the center is a big pink medallion design surrounded with light green, Around the green is a soft pink.

Size: 175x105cm

only £

Free next day delivery on this item

Kilim 19 - from another angle - click to enlarge

Here is a photo from directly above. It is always good to have different views of the kilims so you can get a better idea how the colours look - sometimes they look surprisingly different from different angles.

Click on the picture to enlarge

 

The Meaning of Kilim:

Kilim, a word of Turkish origin, denotes a pileless textile of many uses produced by one of several flat weaving techniques that have a common or closely related heritage and are practiced in the geographical area that includes parts of North Africa, the Balkans, Turkey (Anatolia and Thrace), the Caucasus, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Central Asia and China. Kilims are commonly known as Turkish rugs or Turkish carpets.

The Origins of Kilims:

The lack of convincing evidence tying the origins of the generic kilim or Turkish rug, i.e. flat weave, to a specific place and time leads to the conclusion that the technique itself was probably invented independently be various groups in several locations and at different times in the prehistoric era. However, it is widely believed that the kilim or Turkish Rug, as we define it today, has its origins in the tribal flat weaves of Central Asia.
The first kilim is estimated to emerge six-seven thousand years ago. It seems reasonable to suppose that the kilim evolved from purely utilitarian, non-decorative, non-symbolic applications of weaving in some remote period of prehistory when the human spirit began to express itself through various forms of arts and crafts. It also appears likely that the first weaves were merely a technological advance over animal skins which were probably already decorated with dyes or beads when weaving was discovered, so it is probable that some patterns of color were incorporated into some of the early products of the weaver's loom. But when and where did the technological and artistic strands come together to result in what we know today as a kilim remains unknown. As cultures developed and civilizations emerged, these wool clothing began to tell the story and the cultural behaviors and values of the people who made them. They were also used to tell stories and legends and were used as a way of communication. The essence of a kilim is love, peace and understanding; as these are the virtues that make it possible for civilizations to get along and understand each other.
 
Construction and the Materials Used:

Wool is the primary material used to make kilims. Many kilims are made totally from wool where it is used for both warps and wefts, and wool is the primary weft material used with cotton warps, which accounts for the great majority of all kilims. This popularity of wool is due to its inherent qualities. It is supple, durable, handles easily when spun or woven, readily takes on dyes and, most important, is in plentiful supply in kilim-making regions. There are certain breeds of sheep, like the merino, whose fleece is especially sought-after for its special luster and length of fiber, but actually it's the domestic fat-tailed sheep bred is favourable climatic and grazing conditions that provides much of the excellent fleece used in Turkish rugs. Whatever the source, however, it behoves the kilim maker to use the best wool available to ensure high quality of a kilim if it is to be competitive in world markets. It is generally acknowledged by experts that good quality wool is used today in the production of kilims of repute, thus ensuring them long life - provided they are properly treated.

PARTS OF A KILIM

Wefts run across the width of the rug, over and under the warp strings and between rows of knots. Most often wefts are made of cotton, wool, or silk . Wefts help hold rows of knots in place and strengthen the structure of the rug.

Knots are tied by looping yarn around pairs of warps and cutting off the standing end. The ends of the "knot" become the pile or nap of the rug.

Edge bindings are made by wrapping several warps at the edge of the rug with yarn to reinforce this part of the rug.

End finishes hold knots and wefts from working off the rug's warp strings. Many rug types have a flat-woven kilim selvedge at both ends.

Fringes are formed by gathering and knotting together bundles of warp strings at both ends of the rug after the rug has been cut from the loom. The knots in these bundles of warp strings keep pile knots and end finishes tight at the rug's ends.

DYEING :

The use of vegetables, barks, roots and other natural items to make dyes has been a well known art for many thousands of years. Madder root, indigo, St. John's wart, onion, saffron, sumac, camomile, rhubarb, turmeric, sage, poppy, buckthorn, quince, almond, walnut, chestnut and henna are just a few of the long list of natural dye sources, with madder and indigo perhaps the most commonly used. But what makes dyeing with natural pigment sources approach the esoteric is the fact that in order to achieve a particular hue of color the elements of the "brew" must be just right or the resulting shade will be "off" from what was intended. This means that at least three fundamental variables - the quality and amount of the dyeing agent, the quality and temperature of the water and the time allotted to soaking - must be correctly proportioned in a particular application to the wool, a material with a set of variable properties of its own. To this already complicated brew yet another ingredient is usually added, namely a fixative, a bonding agent known as "mordant". It is applied to the wool before, often during, and occasionally after dyeing. Known as mordanting, this process has its ancient roots in China and India, reportedly passing to Europe via Persia and Turkey. Mordant include the metal compounds potassium aluminium sulphate (alum), copper sulphate, potassium dichromate (chrome), ferrous sulphate (copperas) and stannous chloride (tin); tannin and urine are also used. Below is a list of the major Anatolian dyes used to make kilims:

Woad Blue : From this plant dark or light blue tones are produced by the length of time which the plant is boiled. It is found along the edges of fields groving wild in Central and Western Anatolia. Dyers Woad and some other plants are used to yield indigo which is the oldest and most important blue dye.

Madder Red: The roots of this plant are known as madder. It grows wild in Central and Western Anatolia. A two year old plant will be about one and a half meters height . "Rose madder" was a standard colour on the plates of the old masters of the Renaissance and today, many expensive Italian and English neckties are known as madder ties because of the rich deep toned red colour.

Ox-Eye Camomile Bright Yellow: During the spring, one finds this plant all over Anatolia. It's large, golden yellow flowers a top long stems last throughout the summer. It grows along roadsides and in dry meadows. The flowers, fresh or dried, used along with an alum mordant, produce a bright yellow.

Walnut Tree, Brown: The beautiful walnut tree can be found in the forested country of Eastern Turkey. It is a profusely branched tree which has a height of up to 25 meters and bears peanut leaves. The fruit is covered with a thick green rind which along with the leaves, is often used by villagers for a green or blackish-brown dye. The walnut tree is native in Turkey and is absent only in the regions with several meters. Turkey produces 15-20 percent of the world's walnut crop. The effective colouring agent is the brown dye, juglone, which adheres directly to wool fibres without a mordant (mordant means a fixing agent). In ancient times the walnut pods were used in medicine and for the dyeing of hair.

Pomegranate Tree Yellow to brownish yellow and brown to black: This tree grows in the mild regions of Western, South-western, and North-eastern Anatolia. It's a tall tree with a height of up to 40 meters, with branches that are spiny with very shiny, lance-shaped, dark green leaves. It's easily distinguished by it's beautiful pinkish-violet flowers. During autumn, the tree bears a fruit with many seeds which is the yellow-red skinned pomegranate. The fresh or dried skin of the fruit is used for dyeing. If an alum mordant is used, along with the skin, a yellow brownish shade will result. If an iron mordant is used, a brownish-black shade will result. In Oriental carpets and kilims, the pomegranate is a symbol of fertility and abundance because of it's many seeds.

Buckthorne Deep Yellow: This plant grows only in Turkey on slopes with altitude up to 3000 meters (9843 feet). Before the 20th. century, it was mainly cutivated in Central Anatolia (Konya, Kirsehir, Sivas, Ankara and Kayseri). To day only wild shrubs grow along roadsides, in fields and vineyards at Urgup, Corum and Kahramanmaras, which are areas of farmer cultivation. The unripe fruits, fresh or dried are used to create the dyes. When an alum mordant is used, a deep yellow will result. This deep yellow from the dried fruits is mainly used for dyeing silk. This colour dye is often used to obtain secondary and tertiary colours.

Bast Hemp Brilliant Yellow: This dye is not used as often as other yellow dyes. This plant grows on the mountains of Central and Eastern Anatolia. The brilliant yellow colour is common in older flat weaves. The strong colour is often mistaken for a chemical dye and for this reason it's not popular in Western Anatolia Workshops where weavers cater to foreign market. In Eastern Anatolia, Lake Van area, the kilims are produced for local consumers who prefer bright colours and are less concerned about the distinctions between chemical and natural dyes.

Wild Camomile Yellow: During March, in Western and Southern Anatolia, this camomile plant will cover entire fields with fresh blossoms. With alum mordant, a clear yellow dye will be obtained.

Tree-Leaved Sage Yellow: This herb can be found in most Mediterranean regions. It blooms on the dry hill sides from March up Until August. It is distinctive its tall flowering spikes of mauve or pinkish two-lipped flowers. The leaves and stems, either fresh or dried, are suitable for dyeing. Plants are just one of many sources from which to obtain natural dyes. To obtain a natural dye the plant is boiled to extract the colour. Next, to ensure the absorption of the colour in to the wool a second plant or natural salt is mixed with the dye. This second plant or salt is known as the mordant.

The Difference Between Kilim and Carpet:

The difference between a Turkish rug (kilim) and a regular carpet or pile rug is that whereas the design visible on the kilim is made by interweaving the variously colored wefts and warps, thus creating what is known as a flatweave, in a pile rug individual short strands of different color, usually of wool, are knotted onto the warps and held together by pressing the wefts tightly against each other.

HandMade Kilim Rugs & Kilim Carpets

Handmade rugs have a certain built-in value that ranks them above machine-made products. Hand-made labor is more costly and carries with it a certain expectation of care and quality. Hand-made carpets involve an endless series of choices and decisions, minor twists and turns, that collectively give the piece it's personality and presence, something that the finest machine made carpet lacks. For those who can distinguish such qualities, only hand-made carpets will do, and that involves a certain minimal cost level. Handmade rugs, even a small one, can take many months to produce. A room sized carpet may take the same time, but only because it is produced by multiple weavers working in concert.

Wool

Wool is the most common material used in making rugs, at least in regards to the pile or the flat woven facing of the rug. Rug wool comes primarily from sheep, although goat wool can be used as well. Wool quality can vary enormously. Some wool is soft and lustrous, with a silk sheen that is enlivened by proper illumination. Some wools are dull and unreflective. Lustrous wool is moist or lanolin-rich, far healthier and more durable than dry wool. One of the most important choices that weavers make is the quality of their wool. It affects the cost and the value of the rug. As well as it's ability to stand up to use. Some wools, however, are chosen for their fineness, softness, and textural delicacy. these wools come from the neck and the belly of the sheep, like angora wool, or, in the case of the Nepalese pashmina wool, from the downy layer close to the skin of the animal. Wool may be used for the foundation on the rug as well as for the pile or facing. Wool foundations are particularly typical of nomadic and village weavering.

Handmade Kilims Kilim Carpets | Search Terms | Kilim | Kilims | Flokatis | SITE MAP | HOME | ©2009 Mypashmina UK |